B L O G

dont frustrate your customers

Top 10 UX-UI Design Rules…Sort Of

Top Tens are a popular thing. Any post with a number in the headline, as you probably know from your own experience, seems to get a lot of views.

For me, the Top Ten UX/UI Design Rules really boil down to one rule repeated ten times:

  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.
  • Don't Piss Off Your Customer or Prospect.

This should, in my opinion, be on the radar in all design and planning decisions for digital (or really any) projects.

bad design is unfunctional

Bad (i.e. poorly functioning) design is all around us—from packaging that's too hard to open, to circuitous paths to customer service or the return department, to bad parking lot layouts.

Think about all the times bad design crosses your path in your daily life, then think about anything that might frustrate, slow down, or frankly, piss off your customer…and see what you can do about it.

Some points are obvious, some might be less so:

  • Slow load times on an app or website.
  • Complicated navigation (mostly having too many choices) or burying new/key features.
  • Text that's too small.
  • Pages that are too busy.
  • Colors that aren't contrasty enough (like light gray text on a white background).
  • Not making it clear what next steps the user can take.
  • Checking to make sure users are only one click away from most important information.
  • Being clear about the focus of each page/section/screen (and why the user should care about it).
  • Making sure your website looks good on a desktop/laptop.
    (It's easy to forget, especially with B2B services and products, that people are likely at their desks, in an office, when they do their research or want to make/inquire about a purchase.)
too much content

With regard to content, here are some possible frustrations:

  • Too much content.
    (Appropriate on a blog, not so much in other areas.)
  • Complicated, unnecessarily wordy content.
    (Say what you need to, include what the customer really needs to know, in the most concise way.)
  • Writing things out when a quick two-minute video can say more more clearly and put a human face on the company.
  • Too much 'about you' and not enough 'this is how we help/serve our customers.'
  • Not. having. easy. quick. contact. options. (like a phone number that an actually human picks up.)
    If a prospect is at the point of calling you, turn them into a customer by answering your phone—and not with an automated 'press 1, press 2' sequence.

    If your customer is at the point that they need to call you, again, answer your phone.

    Online chat is great, too—as long as there's an actual human in real time there.
happy customers

And of course, the entire process of product/app/site development needs to start with being clear about what you're trying to accomplish as a business—and what real problem/pain point you're addressing for your customer(s). The whole point of the enterprise needs to revolve around solving a real problem with your product or service.

That and an ongoing awareness of top potential customer frustrations will lead to a more successful product, app, or website (and happier customers).